Transliteracy

Here begins my journey to becoming a librarian. My thoughts as I began my assigned readings and spoke with my classmates ranged from excited to anxious. Transliteracy is fascinating though I don’t think this method of reading is my cup of tea. I believe the books chosen (The Arrival, Trackers, 3:15, Skeleton Creek, and 13 Days to Midnight) were great examples graphic novels and transliteracy. Each of these books incorporated a different form of reading than what we, as a society, would call traditional reading styles. Over the years books have been steadily changed into different formats including audio and e-books. These formats have become more popular but seeing 3:15 give you a code to listen to an intro then provide a reading and then back to the website to watch a short video of the ending of each story was so different than I had ever imagined reading getting. Each book read this week showed a form of reading that is so different from what I am used to and it challenged my resolve to get through these readings. If I am honest I only enjoyed one of these books and it was still tough for me to go back forth between mediums. Trackers was my favorite of the primary readings because it was more straightforward than the other books but I had a hard time maintaining focus going from the reading to the website for more information. I am an old school type of girl, I like to a hold a book in my hand and binge read until the end. These books challenged my norm; I think these would be great for getting children more interested in reading and giving them more options to pique their interest especially in our high tech world. I really enjoyed learning about transliteracy and its advantages in schools.

I understand that education techniques have to expand as new methods and technologies are developed and made available. Transliteracy brought a whole new avenue of technology and learning to my attention. It is an interesting method that I believe would be beneficial to incorporate in schools. It is my belief that offering a more well rounded selection of books each year for classes will allow children to be more engaged in reading. If we give them options from graphic novels to nonfiction to fantasy to whatever other genres you can think of, kids might just want to read rather than finding it to be a chore. I think if you choose a range of genres with the same messages, themes, etc. you can get the points you want across while making reading a more enjoyable experience. Transliteracy is definitely something to take into consideration in my theory for making reading more accessible to children. It won’t be for everyone but no one genre meets everyone’s reading needs. My thoughts on librarianship are that I will be available to assist with projects, research, finding books, recommending books and whatever else might be asked of me in a local school system. I hope to gain more insight into what being a librarian truly means as I am sure that my thoughts are just the tip of the iceberg of librarianship.

1 thought on “Transliteracy”

  1. Nice work, Kristin. I really enjoyed reading your thoughts about this week’s primary readings. I’d like to see you reflect a bit about the secondary readings as well, and how they fit into your philosophy of librarianship, but you’re doing good work so far. Keep it up!

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